Tokyo living : the first week

I wanted to name this post as the 7 day cycle in Tokyo initially but it did not sound as cool as I thought it would (LOL).

After spending 14 months in Moriya, Ibaraki, I decided it was time for change.

A big career change.

And, moved to Tokyo a week ago.

Visiting the Olympic Stadium where Tokyo 2020 magic took place.

Here’s how the first week went by:

Day 1:

I was late for my move-in time. Not a great start and the scorching heat was not helping. I sat in my room for my final Moriya moments (*sob sob*) eating an egg sandwich, just thinking how life would be so different from the inaka (countryside) life to the bustling Tokyo life.

Cleaning, unpacking and going around the neighborhood to get some stuff from the supa and 100 yen stores to decorate my room in Tokyo, left me very very sweaty. I met both my housemates that night and ended up sleeping later than I intended to.

Day 2:

City hall procedures.

If you are a foreign resident living in Japan, with a resident status other than tourist visa, then chances are, this procedure is a standard for anyone.

I decided to familiarize myself with my neighborhood that day and went around in search for a cheaper supa. I really miss how cheap cost of living was in Moriya, Ibaraki.

Day 3:

Met up with a close friend for coffee in the afternoon near my area. And just took things slow, with settling into my new accommodation and city.

Oh, and I almost burnt the house’s toaster oven that night.

Day 4:

At this point, I have not returned home before 8pm and woke up before noon. I decided to wake up early for church and made my way down to Chiba for work that afternoon.

Going back to the countryside was incredibly nostalgic. It took a while to get to Chiba. I felt that I was slowly getting used to the idea of commuting everyday, at day 4. It’s just so convenient. And with Covid, the trains are usually a lot emptier than usual.

Train tracks, Tokyo.

Back in Moriya, I never took the trains, ever. There was no use for trains.

It was so good to be with family that day. I really needed it. Even though I got home late, my heart was very full.

Day 5:

I’ve been busy ever since I moved to Tokyo, busy walking around, meeting friends and exploring the area.

It was finally a day of rest. I stayed in bed for hours and hours, just having some sort of location identity crisis. I felt incredibly lazy to get up to go out or get anything done. I sat in the common lounge, watching tv for hours before I went out to get some paperwork done.

I explored a different area that day. Returned home late that night.

Just so much to explore.

The coast by Odaiba, Tokyo.

Day 6:

I woke up missing Moriya. For once, I woke up missing the familiar life I had for more than a year in Ibaraki.

I ended up exploring beyond my ward, for half a day.

I started the day missing Moriya, the life I had back there, the comfort, and ended up exploring beyond my horizons. The air just felt different, yet, exciting.

I finally cooked a proper meal on my 6th day in Tokyo.

Day 7:

The one week mark.

I realized how convenient Tokyo is. I made last minute plans with my friend and the convenience of Tokyo was to my benefit. I just realized that I live really, like really really close to Shibuya, Shinjuku, Roppongi, Ginza, Odaiba area (explored those area on day 8 to 10).

The days after, I did not have time for missing any familiarity I once had during my two years in Japan, I just felt, the busy-ness and excitement of Tokyo over drowned any doubt and fear. It’s still the early days during my stay here and I am just thrilled & incredibly blessed to have friends with me during my time here in Tokyo. Who knows what the future days will be like, but, it’s starting to sink in my head that,

I am living the Tokyo life.

Oh, and work is starting soon.

Summer season – best season for rose favoured delicacies around Tokyo.
Bringing Tokyo, day by day, closer to you.

Yen